Seasons In The Garden: The Blue Border

A recent comment on Linda Lehmusvirta’s Central Texas Gardener FB page got me thinking about putting together a post showing a typical year in my garden from one angle, so you could really see how the garden changed throughout the seasons. I picked three angles that have stayed relatively static over the course of a year, and found as many similiarly-framed pictures as I could. I am not a very consistent photographer, so it was more challenging to find pictures than I expected.

Here is probably my favorite part of the garden, the Blue Border, which I put together last winter when I decided I wanted less watering and more evergreen interest. I am starting this post in January and going through the end of November. I’ll have to update with some December pictures at the end of the year.

 

Mid-January. I haven't done much winter cleanup yet.

Mid-January. I haven’t started my winter cleanup yet.

February 23rd. The underplantings of oxalis, narcissus, ajuga, and spring starflower are really starting to shine.

February 23rd. The underplantings of oxalis, narcissus, ajuga, and spring starflower are really starting to shine.

A closer view.

A closer view.

The beginning of May.

The beginning of May.

A closer look.

A closer look.

May 27. The datura is really taking off.

May 27. The datura is really taking off.

Early June - the coneflowers are open!

Early June – the coneflowers are open!

September 22

September 22

September 22-- dusk.

September 22– dusk.

October 20, Austin's "second spring."

October 20, Austin’s “second spring.”

October 20

October 20

Mid-November

Mid-November. And then it froze and I didn’t take any new pictures until January when I started my winter cleanup!

 

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About The Gardener of Good & Evil

@good_n_evil
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8 Responses to Seasons In The Garden: The Blue Border

  1. I like this blue border quite a lot and remember it from your tour last year. The structure of agave and yucca keep the interest as plants change and fill in over the year. You show why It’s important to consider what perennial die back looks like in the winter. Great overview, you were so fast with this one, I’ll be back to share my links of course.

  2. Fabulous! I love seeing how your garden changed. Definitely, you have a good eye for design!

  3. Margo says:

    I loved your yard on the tour last summer. It’s really great to see how that bed changes over the year. I hope you’ll post more of these.

    • Thanks, Margo! I think I am definitely gonna post more of these. I have two more views almost ready to post. It’s pretty fascinating to watch how things change over the course of the year. Going through my pictures also made me realize how many areas of my garden I enjoy but rarely photograph, and I am gonna focus on those for the next 12 months so I can do some more posts in this vein next year!

  4. Laura says:

    That February picture is incredible. Makes me want to changes some things in the back garden. You’ve done a great job of 4 season gardening!

  5. Pingback: Evergreens, color, and hardscape carry garden through winter into spring | Digging

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